curling short hair

Curling Short Hair | Quick & Easy

curling short hair

Having shorter hair is both a blessing and a curse. It’s light weight and lovely, but you pretty much always have to style it because putting it into a bun (without 5947549 bobby pins) doesn’t work.

However, styling it doesn’t have to be a hassle or a time sucker. For me, curling my hair is quicker than flat ironing and I think it looks better on my face shape – and more put together!

Here’s an easy to follow “tutorial” to curl your short hair in 15 minutes or less. It takes me about 10 minutes and I have a ton of hair, although it’s very fine. There is some natural wave to it, but it’s mainly pretty straight.

I wash my hair at night, sleep on it wet, and tackle the beast in the morning. This removes the dreaded blowdrying nightmare as well as reduces the amount of heat that I put on my hair since it’s color treated. It also adds a lot of volume at the top versus just blowdrying.

I typically only use two products to curl my hair (unless I need stronger hold for a long day, etc.)

A 1-inch Conair Infiniti Pro curling iron with a clamp. I love this one. I’ve had more expensive brands but this is the best. I love it so much that I bought a bigger barrel version and the flat iron in the same line.

You could use a wand but that takes longer.

I also use a heat protectant/hair spray combo – yes, they exist – called Hot Off the Press by Paul Mitchell. I spray this on each section of my hair, generously. You can really use any heat protectant you like, though. Just use something.

I set mine to the second heat setting (330 degrees).

curling iron temperature

Tip: when you clamp your hair, start toward the root and pulse it down toward the ends. This allows the heat to reach all of the hair and avoids having the curl just at the ends.

Step 1: Bottom Layer

I section my hair into 3 parts, but you may only need 2 – or maybe 4. Brush or comb out the section, spray your protectant and curl.

The bottom section is the shortest length, so I alternate the directions I curl – toward the face and away from the face. Don’t worry if you can’t get to each piece of hair. It blends.

comb your hair

heat protectant

bottom layer

See, alternating sections.

finger comb

When I’m done with the bottom layer, I finger comb through the curls so they aren’t ringlets.

Moving onto the next section…

Step 2: Middle Layer

Repeat the same steps, but being a bit more careful to get most of the pieces of hair – especially if you have naturally straight hair like me. I take pretty large sections, and I alternate the directions of curls here, too.

Why do I alternate the directions? Because then the curls won’t get stuck together into one giant curl. This adds more movement and texture.

I leave about 1/2 inch to an inch of hair out at the bottom, too. This helps it look more effortless and beachy.

Tip: start from the back of your head and work forward on each side of your head. It makes it easier to see what you’re doing when the curls aren’t in your way. 

second layer

middle layer

Leaving a little bit of hair out at the ends.

ringlet curls

When you’re done with that section you’ll be left with some pretty hot ringlet curls. OH YEAH! Just kidding, comb them out with your fingers – if you want.

finger combing

Step 3: Top Layer

Almost done! Repeat the same steps on this section. However, I do NOT alternate the directions of the curls on the top layer. That’s about the only difference.

When you get to your bangs/front sections, start your curling iron down lower on that piece and pulse down. You don’t want to start too high there or you will look like Shirley Temple.

Top layer

top layer curls

curled short hair

curling short hair

See? Quick and easy. If you are new to curling your hair, just practice to see which way to turn the barrel so you won’t get kinks. With practice, it’ll be super quick and easy.

Again, I can do this in 10 minutes. Perfect for when the baby comes so I won’t look like a hot mess ALL the time.

Thanks for reading!

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